SSDI

The Death Master File (DMF) from the Social Security Administration (SSA) (commonly known as the Social Security Death Index) is created from internal SSA records of deceased persons possessing social security numbers and whose deaths were reported to the SSA.

Funeral homes often report deaths to the SSA as a service to family members. Beginning in 1962, the SSA began to use a computer database for processing requests for benefits. About 98% percent of the people in the SSDI died after 1962, but a few death dates go back as far as 1937. Because legal Aliens in the U.S. can obtain a Social Security card, their names may appear in the SSDI if their deaths were reported. Some 400,000 railroad retirees are also included in the SSDI.

The Social Security Death Index is not an index to all deceased individuals who have held Social Security Numbers. It is not a database of all deceased individuals who have received Social Security Benefits, or whose families have received survivor benefits.

<< The Genealogy Guide

<< Archived Materials

What's New in Genealogy ... Today!
click to view original photo